The agreement also provided for outrage from all national and non-national militias. In addition, Taif laid the foundations for privileged relations between Lebanon and Syria, with repercussions for the political environment of both countries. Of the three principles, the first two are the most relevant to this discussion of Lebanese sectarianism. However, the third would prove to be the most important. The agreement formed the principle of “mutual coexistence” (اليش السششترك) between the different Lebanese sects and their “appropriate political representation” (صحة التاثيلللاارا͸ئئڊل¤¤اارژئئ¤¤¤اراتتيلللارcle) as the main objective of parliamentary electoral laws after the civil war. [6] He also restructured the political system of the National Pact in Lebanon by deriving part of the power of the Maronite Christian community that had obtained a privileged status in Lebanon under French rule. The problem of Lebanese evacuees must be resolved in depth and the right of any Lebanese displaced since 1975 to return to the place from which he was expelled is defined. Legislative measures will be taken to guarantee this right and to secure funds for reconstruction. Considering that the objective of the Lebanese State is to disseminate its authority over all Lebanese territories through its own armed forces, mainly represented by the internal security forces, and taking into account the fraternal relations that bind Syria to the authority of the Lebanese State for a period not exceeding two years, starting with the ratification of the Charter of the National Accord, the election of the President of the Republic, the formation of the Cabinet of National Unity and the approval of political reforms at the constitutional level.

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