Expressions of rupture such as half, part of, a percentage of, a majority of are sometimes singular and sometimes plural, depending on the importance. (The same is true, of course, if everyone, everyone, more, most and some act as subjects.) Sums and products of mathematical processes are expressed in singular and require singular verbs. The phrase “more than one” (strangely) takes on a singular verb: “More than one student has tried to do so.” Have you ever received “subject/verb”, like an error on a paper? This handout will help you understand this common grammar problem. 11. The singular form of the verb is usually reserved for units of measure or units of tense. Like the prepositional sentence, the who/the/which clause never contains the subject. The titles and nouns of the countries take the singular form of the verb. Examples: my aunt or uncle arrives today by train. Neither Juan nor Carmen are available. Either Kiana or Casey help decorate the scene today. If both names with “Ni ni. Nor” are singular, and then we use the singular verb. (The verb is singular, although the plural verb may be possible) Rule 6.

In sentences that begin with here or there, the real subject follows the verb. The verbs in the present tense for singular subjects in the third person (he, them, he and everything these words can represent) have S endings. Other verbs do not add S endings. The basic rule. A singular subject (she, Bill, car) takes a singular verb (is, goes, shines), while a plural meeting takes a plural verb. Rule 2. Two singular subjects, which are connected by or by or, or, or, or not, neither/nor connected, require a singular verb. 4. When sentences begin with “there” or “here”, the subject is always placed according to the verb. He must show a little care to properly identify each piece.

4. In the case of compound subjects related by or nor, the verb corresponds to the subject closest to it. If used in the plural, group names mean MORE THAN ONE GROUP. That`s why it uses a plural lease…